Design Trust 2020 July Cycle Grant Recipients | Design Trust Call for Grants

8. 10. 2020

Design Trust 2020 October Grant Application is now open. Share with us your ideas and proposals by 20 October 2020. Design Trust offers grants to designers, curators, collectives and non-profit organisations for project proposals that are relevant to the context and content of Hong Kong and the region. For more details, please visit here.

Grant recipients from the July 2020 cycle include Ingrid Chu Pui Yee (Hong Kong), Chicky Ajoy Bhavnani and her team at MakerBay Foundation (Hong Kong), Yeung Kin Bong (Hong Kong), Ibiye Camp (Guangzhou & Buguma), Fong Wan Chi (Hong Kong).

2020 July Cycle Feature Grant Recipient:

Ingrid Chu Pui Yee’s ‘Breaching Sanctum: The Architectural Impulse in Recent Art by Women in Asia’ delves into the role that architecture plays in contemporary creative culture; specifically, for a generation of women creatives from Asia who were born in the 1980s, just on the cusp of when exhibitions in the 1990s would come to define Chinese contemporary art internationally. The project explores how architecture has shaped cultural development in the region, and the resulting impact on the narrative around Chinese women creatives whose practices, encompassing drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, video, and other media, share an architectural impulse that reflects how changing surroundings in the built environment shape and reflect subjective experience, both for themselves and others.

2020 July Cycle Seed Grant Recipients:

Chicky Ajoy Bhavnani and her team at MakerBay Foundation are designing and planning to fabricate “CoralBot”, a low-cost and open source Coral Reef Mapping Drone to monitor and assess the health of corals in Hong Kong and worldwide. Aware of the critical role of coral reefs in maintaining healthy coasts and vibrant economies, as well as the threat of climate change to global reefs, MakerBay Foundation is responding to the urgent need for regular and accurate monitoring to assess the vital complex architecture of reefs. “CoralBot” will be a semi-autonomous boat with several high quality and specialised cameras, that will target shallow coral reefs to map and monitor coral reefs both within and outside of marine protected areas. The physical product will have both remote control (RC) capacity and autonomous route planning with GPS waypoints, developed in parallel with a specifically designed software to control the robot including A.I. to classify corals and evaluate their health. Makerbay Foundation plan to share environmental data collected by “CoralBot” to help scientists get a more comprehensive understanding of the evolving state of coral reefs, accompanied by a series of photogrammetric maps of coral reefs in the Greater Bay Area, and an online platform to promote the Robot and the importance of Coral Reef Conservation.

Yeung Kin Bong aims to develop a human-oriented, constructive and innovative plan for an age-friendly community that encourages active ageing and enhances older people’s quality of life. Continuing on the research of “Revitalising Village through Culture” , supported by Design Trust in 2018, “The Golden Autumn – A Participatory Design Project” will employ a collective and participatory approach in research and design, recruiting the direct participation of the targeted community through a series of design thinking exercises and applied theatre activities. Focusing on the Yau Tsim Mong District, Yeung Kin Bong will study participant’s habits, emotions, and behaviours during these community workshops, which will inform the design of solutions to the pain points of the elderly community, presented in the form of art installations, spatial design, interactive activities, and architectural interventions. In February 2021, a feasible masterplan for an age-friendly community will be presented to the District Council, developed as a model that can be later adopted by others.

Yeung Kin Bong aims to develop a human-oriented, constructive and innovative plan for an age-friendly community that encourages active ageing and enhances older people’s quality of life.

Ibiye Camp will conduct a research project on the Chinese-Nigerian textile trade in the hopes of demonstrating an entanglement of traditions, communication, bodies, and machines through her project “Remaining Threads”. Interested in how Madras, an iconic fabric originating from India that circulated around the world during the transatlantic slave trade, has evolved into a variety of designs redefined by communities, Ibiye Camp explores its transformation through thread pulling and redesigned textures into Pelete Bite in practices traditional to Buguma, Nigeria. Ibiye plans to carry out her research in Guangzhou, where African-style textiles are heavily manufactured and Sub-Saharan African traders who reside in Guangzhou act as a middle-man between the manufactures and exports to markets in the African continent.

Fong Wan Chi’s project, the "After Life Journal' Handbook Design & Publication Prototype" sets out to be an intervention against the taboo of death in Chinese society, intending to respond to the social issues relating to the increasing aging population in Asia. The workshop will introduce various procedures one needs to go through when dealing with death, whereby each participant will be the editor of their own journal through which their personal views on death are exchanged. This project encourages participants to be more knowledgeable and less uncomfortable with the idea of death by providing related psychological support information and a platform for communication, as well as using funeral design as a means to introduce the idea of graphic visual, media and space design.

Fong Wan Chi’s project, the “After Life Journal”, sets out to be an intervention against the taboo of death in Chinese society, intending to respond to the social issues relating to the increasing aging population in Asia.