70%VISIBILITY: The story of Modernism in Hong Kong

70% VISIBILITY relates to the region’s climate: thick humidity blended with hazy pollution which often makes it difficult to see clearly and understand the surroundings; just like Hong Kong’s blurred architectural theory which partially traveled from overseas and adopted spontaneously in the city of land shortage, skyrocketing growth and extreme pragmatism. This project, formatted as a series of published articles and visual stories, and culminating with an exhibition and panel discussion, investigates the beginnings of modernism and its relationship with the current language of the city in its various forms and spaces, from buildings (Jardine House) and urban objects (footbridges) to historical narratives (Social Housing and the ‘hashtag tower’).

70% VISIBILITY relates to the region’s climate: thick humidity blended with hazy pollution which often makes it difficult to see clearly and understand the surroundings; just like Hong Kong’s blurred architectural theory which partially traveled from overseas and adopted spontaneously in the city of land shortage, skyrocketing growth and extreme pragmatism. This project, formatted as a series of published articles and visual stories, and culminating with an exhibition and panel discussion, investigates the beginnings of modernism and its relationship with the current language of the city in its various forms and spaces, from buildings (Jardine House) and urban objects (footbridges) to historical narratives (Social Housing and the ‘hashtag tower’).

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Design Trust Seed Grant

2019
Grantee: Natasza Minasiewicz

Natasza is a Polish researcher, designer and photographer of architecture based in Hong Kong. As a graduate of Architecture and City Planning at the Wroclaw University of Technology (Msc) and an alumnus of Parsons, The New School in New York, she focuses on researching the Modern Movement in the Pearl River Delta Region, publishing for Design Anthology Magazine, lecturing commercial design as well as running her own architecture and interior design practice. She integrates research, technology, crafts and photography, in an environmentally conscious and culturally engaging way.